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addictive behavior

There was a time, not so long ago, when I could reach my hand out in any direction and the first object I'd encounter would be a floppy disk. Not long before that, those disks would be low density, holding a mere 720k each. Before that, the sum of my knowledge was stored on 5.25" disks. I still have those in boxes, but can't imagine ever using them again.

I still have zipdisks everywhere. They're still useful, though I can't imagine buying more blanks, since it's so much cheaper to burn CDs now. And even CDs have grown unweildy. I've got shelves and booklets to keep everything sorted, yet they pile up around me in disorganized stacks. And the call goes out: I yearn for a DVD writer.

I'm compressing my DVD collection into 20 page binders - the sleeves take up considerably less space than the original packaging, which is smaller still than their VHS counterparts.

The conclusion I draw as I search for specific bits of information is this: Mass storage is not the solution. Making things smaller does not actually clear space; it only allows for more clutter.

I have more information and media stored than I will ever know what to do with. And yet, this certain knowledge does nothing to quell my obsession with accumulating more. And my efforts to keep up with this collection put me in deficit - simply put, I consume more than I produce.

The best artists in any genre rarely pay much attention to what their contemporaries are doing; they don't have time to care. But the lure of instant gratification is overpowering - why tell my stories when I can listen to yours?

I don't really know what to do about this, to be honest. I mean, I have the answer, but I'm not ready to do anything that drastic yet.

Which means I'm stuck in this destructive pattern a while longer.

...and that's just the way I like it.


self portrait (escher)
some guy

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