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They say we can never truly know someone until we walk a mile in their shoes. Have any of you ever tested this? Can you remember a time where someone else asked to borrow your shoes so they could better understand you?

Yeah, me neither.

I'm not here to advocate a global footwear exchange, though. Just reflecting, really.

'cause, I bought new shoes yesterday. Same size, same brand, same exact model as what I had before. But, they're completely foreign.

My old shoes are in surprisingly good shape. I've had 'em for three years, I think. (No, wait. Two.)

The seams are still holding, the soles are still attached, I'm fairly confident they're still waterproof. But, they're all worn out on the bottom from where my feet scuff the ground. I apparently favor the rear outside corner of each foot, so much that I've lost half an inch of either shoe there. Those edges have eroded to roundness over time, and having them returned so solidly in the replacements is forcing me to adjust my stance. To walk differently. To stretch different muscles, and re-learn how to stand.

That's why it was so important to buy these. I fell down inexplicably in San Diego last week. Just tripped over nothing, scraped myself up, and tore a chunk of flesh out of my hand. I had a similar fall after Zach's Show down in LA, but that was more embarassing than painful. And it seems to me there was a third incident before that. I just figured I was growing less coordinated, putting insufficient thought into these basic motor functions. But, no. Having transformed my feet into unbalanced rolling surfaces is more likely the cause.

So, out with the bad, and in with the unknown.

The parallel with everything else going on is not lost on me.

How can we be expected to know ourselves until we walk a mile in our own shoes?

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